Retender for GGK RIV

GGK Ford Ranger RIV.

SHAH ALAM: Retender for GGK RIV. It appears that the Rapid Intervention Vehicle for the GGK has been retendered. The tender for the RIV was published on March 10 on the Kementerian Pertahanan website only and not the government e-tender page.

As the ministry website does not give access to the tender documents I am not sure whether the RIV tender published is the same as the one issued earlier in January.

As for the latest stuff for the GGK, the Defence Ministry on Jan. 9 advertised request for bids for 20 vehicles, four Rapid Intervention Vehicle (RIV) and 16 Special Operations Vehicle (SOV). We were aware that the SOV tender was coming back in DSA 2018 as a number of vehicles were displayed during the show harking the requirement, basically to replace the Glover Webb SOV already in service with the GGK.

For the RIV, the requirements publically accessible points to a much capable vehicle than the current Ford Ranger.

The RIV is intended for storming a hijacked aircraft on the ground or buildings in counter terrorist operations and able to deploy for tactical approach to docked ship, buses/coaches and trains.

Austrian CT operators entering a flat from two RIV fitted with the Mobile Adjustable Ramp System manufactured American company, Patriot3. Internet

Based on the above, I am assuming that the RIV being sought will be armoured and equipped with a ramp to facilitate entry and exit into buildings, docked ship, buses/coaches, aircraft and trains.

UTK operators posed with their IAG Jaws 4X4 RIV. PDRM

I will hazard a guess that it was a retender for the RIV part of the GGK tender. Perhaps they changed the field code or Kod Bidang to signify that only companies which had the certification can bid for the tender. The field code is 110106 which is for special vehicles. Or simply a retender was required no company had put in bids that satisfied the requirements especially the monetary one.

A GGK RIV at the 2015 Army demo

The closing date for the RIV bid is on March 3. If you or your company has the right field code and has the vehicle suitable for the tender, please enter a bid. And if you win, drop me a line, I will share the news with the Malaysian Defence readers. Anyhow please tak the Movement Control Order, seriously, stay at home at all times if its possible.

— Malaysian Defence

If you like this post, buy me an espresso. Paypal Payment

Share
About Marhalim Abas 1629 Articles
Shah Alam

4 Comments

  1. Marhalim,

    Off topic. Are infantry units – whether battalion or brigade level – always commanded by officers who are from the Royal Ranger or Malay Regiment? The reason I’m asking is I remembered a conversation I had with a certain General who retired about a decade ago. He joined the Royal Artillery Corps but later on in his career also commanded a Malay Regiment unit? Does this sound strange to you?

    Also, back in the 1970’s anyone who had just joined the army had to have some years of experience before attempting selection for Gerak Khan; then the rules were changed enabling anyone who had just completed recruit training to do so (same with PASKAL and I assume with PASKAU. Am I correct in saying that although Gerak Khas members at later points in their career will be posted out of their unit (say to MINDEF or to a staff position); they will never end up commanding a non Gerak Khas unit: e.g. a Gerak Khas officer promoted to Brigadier and given command of an infantry brigade.

    Another question : has 10 Para ever been commanded by a non Malay Regiment CO?
    Back to Gerak Khas; we of course had a Gerak Khas man who became army chief but he joined the army as a Royal Malay Regiment officer; at a time when new officers could not directly join Gerak Khas

    Reply
    AFAIK no, they must be commissioned into RMR/Rangers, the guy you talked could have been commissioned as RMR/Rangers but later move on to other units. Most of the time they kept the original commissioning unit. Not at the Brigade level but the Ranger battalion. He was the 5th DIV GOC some two years ago. GGK as a small unit has a real stove pipe problem furthermore some officers had battle field promotion instead of OCS so they lacked the old school connections to get ahead and their age also sometimes a hindrance to further promotion. Yes the ex PAT is likely the last GGK qualified officer to attain the rank. Yes most of the current GGK officers lack the necessary experience to command other units than their own or a smaller command under JForce. Probably they were also given command courses but only Paskal in the last decade or so has been given command courses to its officers so they could be become ship’s CO, AFAIK only one had commanded a sea going ship, some were given command when ships were laid up in the shipyards. The current Paskal commander and his predecessor, the PGB holder, have been given commands, the latter before while the former after the Paskal command

  2. “Are infantry units – whether battalion or brigade level – always commanded by officers who are from the Royal Ranger or Malay Regiment? The reason I’m asking is I remembered a conversation I had with a certain General who retired about a decade ago. He joined the Royal Artillery Corps but later on in his career also commanded a Malay Regiment unit? Does this sound strange to you?”

    If you could shed some light on the man’s various tours, we might be able to decide if it is “strange.” By “strange” I’m not sure if you mean illogical or simply uncommon. I don’t see anything wrong for an officer to start in one branch, switch into another and eventually command units in it- but how common is this in practice? It would only be wrong if he lacked experience in the relevant unit before assuming command.

    I recall our previous discussion covering how one’s regimental affiliation as an individual always remains the one he was commissioned into, regardless of the branches that he eventually serves in. But I would think it is completely symbolic.

    Reply
    It’s symbolic alright but one that’s make difference when promotion and command decisions come especially when the committees are usually filled and led by people from the same branch as they are the majority

  3. AM – “If you could shed some light on the man’s various tours, we might be able to decide”

    Started his career in the Royal Artillery Corps and did an Artillery Course in Canada. We spend most of the conversation on artillery, including going through the various Canadian artillery manuals still in his possession. In passing he mentioned later commanding an infantry unit. I never gave it much thought to it until yesterday – the conversation was about 20 years ago.

    To me it makes sense that infantry units at battalion and brigade level are commanded by RMR/RRR officers. At divisional level (on paper) it’s different; because the divisional staff will have artillery, signals, engineering, etc, officers attached (the same would apply to a smaller/lesser extent at brigade level HQs) but I have no idea if any division has ever been commanded by a non infantry CO. Similarly, has 10 Para ever been commanded by a non RMR/RRR CO? By guess is no.

    It’s expected that irrespective of one’s regiment or arm of service; an officer at various points in his career will be posted to differ assignments/units in order to give him the needed experience. Whilst it’s for certain that someone from a non combat arm will never command a combat unit; it’s uncertain (to me at least); whether someone from one of the army’s combat arms (other than infantry) will do so; e.g. an artillery and commanding an infantry brigade or
    battalion.

  4. “For the RIV, the requirements publically accessible points to a much capable vehicle than the current Ford Ranger.”
    For that, are they still looking at pickup truck options like Ford F-150 to F-350 uparmoured or a totally bespoked armoured vehicle like an MRAP/armoured truck?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*