Open Ship Days Next Week

RMN Open Ship 2023. RMN

SHAH ALAM: RMN will hold an open ship programme at six locations across the peninsula as part of its 89th anniversary celebrations, next week. Various RMN ships will be opened to the public on the two days, namely, April 27 and 28. Entrance is free though only Malaysians will be allowed into the ships.

The location are as follows:

a. Tambatan Pangkalan Lumut, Perak
b. Tambatan Pangkalan Pulau Langkawi, Kedah
c. Tambatan Pangkalan Pulau Indah, Selangor
d. Tambatan Pangkalan Tg Pengelih, Johor
e. Tambatan Pangkalan Kuantan, Pahang
f. Swettenham Pier Cruise Terminal, Pulau Pinang

Tarikh: 27-28 April 2023

Masa: 9.00 pagi hingga 5.00 petang

RMN Open Ship locations. RMN

Additional information provided by Resident Naval Officer Penang:

Prosedur hadir ke Program Hari Terbuka Kapal TLDM
1. Tiada had umur. Pendaftaran boleh dibuat di kaunter masuk melalui imbasan pada QR Code. Pendaftaran awal amatlah digalakkan bagi kelancaran urusan masuk pelawat. Pendaftaran hanya untuk individu berumur 7 tahun dan ke atas.
2. Tiada bayaran dikenakan.
3. Pelawat akan berjalan kaki (anggaran 450 meter) sambil menikmati persekitaran jeti, pemandangan kapal-kapal dan angin laut. Hati-hati, jangan jatuh dalam ayaq sudah 😄!
4. Sepanjang program, kami akan sediakan petugas keselamatan untuk mengawal keadaan dan memastikan keselamatan anda semua.
5. Kawasan jeti dan kapal adalah dilarang merokok.
6. Jangan buang sampah ke laut. Sayangi laut kita.
7. Pakai pakaian bersesuaian. Elakkan memakai kasut bertumit tinggi, berjubah labuh dan sebagainya. Di kapal, ada beberapa kawasan yang memerlukan anda menaiki tangga dan merentasi ‘gangway’. Dilarang memakai pakaian yang melambangkan parti politik dan unsur-unsur sensitif.
8. Kanak-kanak dilarang masuk sekiranya tiada pengawasan dewasa.
9. Dibuka untuk warganegara Malaysia sahaja.
10. Souvenier TLDM dan kapal turut dijual.

Penang open ship programme. RMN

Selamat Hari Raya Aidil Fitri. Maaf Zahir Batin.

— Malaysian Defence

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Shah Alam

15 Comments

  1. Even tho its during Hari Raya period but too bad its still on weekdays Thurs & Fri 🙁
    Some of us still have to work thru the week and such unfortunately so I could not go for the open day 🙁 🙁

    Hopefully next time TLDM would have it on a weekend.

  2. “Entrance is free though only Malaysians will be allowed into the ships”

    This is bizarre. Granted hardly any foreigners will go but why exclude them? For what possible reason? This is the first time such a restriction has been imposed. I hope nobody’s silly enough to cite security reasons as there is nothing of security value to be gained: not as if visitors are allowed access to the CIC [which anyhow is always padlocked when the ship’s moored] or the ship’s magazine [also always padlocked with keys by the officer on duty].

    I’ve been to Open Days in various countries over the years; none were ever restricted to nationals for the simple reason that there are/were security risks.

    ” Resident Naval Officer Penang”

    Not many are aware there is such a post. The only RMN asset in the state however is a bungalow.

  3. IMHO doing it on weekdays is one way to keeps the crowd “small and manageable”.

  4. It will be at least by 2026-2027 before we could see RMN Fleet given a new updated look. Hopes we could get stop gap measure hull meantime to keep things in the balance while LCS, 2nd Batch LMS and NGPV plus MPSS materialize. IMO, Arming the Kedah NGPV would be most cost and time effective measure.

  5. ” Resident Naval Officer Penang”

    This is a historical post form the royal navy days.

    Originally the RNO facilitates the smooth running of port operations for all visiting Royal Navy Ships and vessels, at a port where there is no permanent naval base that could support ship visits, and requires civilian port support.

    Other current TLDM RNO post is in Kuching Sarawak, and allegedly also in Lumut (why is this is not known). There are also former RNO posts in Sabah, but permanent TLDM bases are now built where there was one, so RNO post is replaced with CO.

    IMO a location that can have a RNO post is in Port Klang, where foreign naval ships frequently visits and uses the cruise terminal jetty.

  6. “Granted hardly any foreigners will go but why exclude them? For what possible reason?”
    Everyone will have different perception to security, some would only one lock on their door, some would have two locks, others have 3 locks, and maybe some have even more. Just cuz other nation have laxer security doesn’t mean we should follow. As I said before we have reasons for our own security levels placed and this should/would extend to dealings with 3rd parties.

  7. ”Everyone will have different perception to security, some would only one lock on their door”

    The doors of the CIC and other places are always locked when ships are moored irrespective of the navy. One padlock is the norm from what I’ve personally seen. Yes I’m keenly aware that everyone has ”different perception to security” but that wasn’t the point.

    ”As I said before we have reasons for our own security levels placed and this should/would extend to dealings with 3rd parties.”

    ”As I said before” : I’m curious as to why we would place such restrictions given there is nothing of value to be gained; from anyone; be it foreigners or locals who board a ship and who are only granted access to the main and quarter deck; plus maybe the hangar. At times even access to the bridge is denied and if it isn’t it’s supervised.

    ”Just cuz other nation have laxer security doesn’t mean we should follow. ”

    Nor did anyone imply we should did they now…? I only alluded to the fact that I’ve been on Open Days in various countries [none of whom are known for ”lax” security”]; there were no restrictions on who could board for the simple reason that there is nothing sensitive which can be compromised. Doesn’t mean these navies ”have laxer security” or that I was suggesting we be lax or that countries not have a different attitude towards security…

  8. “One padlock is the norm from what I’ve personally seen.”
    Its just an example where different person would lock up their houses differently; one might only use 1 lock, some might go up to 3-4 locks on their front door. No right or wrong here as different person will have different perception to their security. The same goes for different nations towards the security of their military equipment.

    “I’m curious as to why we would place such restrictions given there is nothing of value to be gained”
    A lot of assumptions would have to be made if want to speculate but I guess even TLDM would have to make certain assumptions and weigh the risks involved if foreign agents were to infiltrate onboard the ship. It would have to assume that Msian citizen would not intentionally seek to detriment the ship, or that a ship’s position could be tracked by the foreign party thru simply dropping something as innocuous as an Apple Airtag, or perhaps even if sensitive areas are off limits that sabotage on noncritical areas (ie pipes or cables routing) could still cripple a ship during operations. And many other potential risks could have been weighted by TLDM head honchos when presenting their ships to the public.

    “Nor did anyone imply we should did they now…?”
    This was a followon to my argument with you regarding building TLDM naval ships at civvie yards or other local yards that has to be security vetted. You mentioned you do not see the necessity as other nations would not care but TLDM might have a different opinion, just as they have a different perception to ship security than you have.

  9. ”guess even TLDM would have to make certain assumptions and weigh the risks involved if foreign agents”

    I ”guess” that the decision was made by a local commander and it was not scrutinised by higher authority. Such things have happened before; i.e. a blog [now defunct] owner using an image the RMAF posted on his blog and later getting a polite but frantic call to take it down due to security reasons and being asked where he got the image; a TV3 reporter on a C-130 about to leave for Split being called off at the last minute because it was discovered he was on the ‘Jejak Rasul’ show and was in Jersusalem [later he was told there was a mistake but the plane had left]; a Corporal at a trade show insisting something could not be photographed but his replacement saying otherwise; me in 1989 being told I could photograph anything but the close up of a Cockerill; etc. Marhalim has stories of his own from personal experience over the years.

    Quite often decisions at made at a local level but might not reflect policy or might be the sole decision of a local commander based on his own whim. As a General once told me; at times some of the decisions made are ludicrous but they happen and quite often do not reflect policy.

    Again; I fully understand the need for security; having been to various exhibitions/trade shows/ Open Days throughout the years I have seen different approaches to security in a number of places but I [like others I know] question certain decisions taken; certain decisions which were later rescinded by higher ups and which made little sense.

    ”You mentioned you do not see the necessity as other nations would not care but TLDM might have a different opinion,”

    For the simple reason that there is nothing to be gain from a security perspective; visitors – irrespective of nationality – simply won’t be in a position where they can obtain anything of security value. In a few weeks trade visitors at LIMA will be able to board certain RMN ships but just like visitors at Open Days they will not be granted access to any part of the ship which is sensitive.

    ”just as they have a different perception to ship security than you have.”

    This is the first time the RMN has imposed such restrictions and I was merely wondering why…

    … – ”building TLDM naval ships at civvie yards or other local yards that has to be security vetted. ”

    Correction. I see the need for security [didn’t say otherwise] and there is security; i.e. every car entering BNS has to be checked upon entering and leaving but ultimately the intel that some might desire is not the kind that would be obtained from a brief visit to a facility; especially given the yard and the base is fully visible from Pangkor; that satellite imagery is easily obtainable and that visitors are never left unsupervised.

  10. “I ”guess” that the decision was made by a local commander”
    If this no foreigner rule applies for all the TLDM bases on the open day it is not a ‘decision was made by a local commander’.

    “For the simple reason that there is nothing to be gain”
    And as I pointed out, there are many other possibilities and TLDM might have the same wavelength as me. Anything can happen even if you might not think so.

    “the intel that some might desire is not the kind that would be obtained from a brief visit to a facility”
    If a facility is easily accessible it not always a matter of brief visits but rather from permanent access to such facilities. The many US confidential security leaks are from people who have regular access to the area but was not properly vetted. They weren’t spies per se but the info leaked were just as damaging (and likely those obtained from real spy agents, those that public aren’t aware, are even more damaging).

  11. ”t is not a ‘decision was made by a local commander’.”

    I have no idea but there have been decisions made in the past that were the initiative of the local commander; some I alluded to in a previous post. Another which comes to mind are the 2 journos/reporters [one from NST if memory serves] who were detained for taking photos of the first batch of arriving Hornets from outside the base. They were detained for hours under the orders of the base CO but later released when a higher up decided it was ludicrous and posed no security risk.

    ”TLDM might have the same wavelength as me”

    Gratifying to hear.

    ”Anything can happen even if you might not think so.”

    Please don’t make it sound as if I ‘might not think so” or I don’t see the need for security. I’m quite aware of the need for security but I’m equally aware that a compromise is needed and that a times we’ve [like others] have gone to far. You want to talk about security; by right every serving member of the MAF who travels abroad and who marries a foreigner has to get prior permission. Needed? Yes but at times wide discretion is granted.

    ”The many US confidential security leaks are from people who have regular access to the area but was not properly vetted”

    Some are ” properly vetted” – Ames, Pollard, Walker, Vanunu, Blunt, Philby, Burgess, Penkovsky and others come to mind; as well as the handful of people [one RMN] we uncovered in 1993/4 who we said were spying for a foreign country [read Singapore] and Mahathir’s [before he became PM] former political secretary who provided stuff to the KGB [some Russian embassy people were expelled. Ultimately, my discussion was not centered on insiders.

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