Five Days of Flying

The cabin of an EC 725 AP after it is loaded with the food items. TUDM

SHAH ALAM: Five days of flying. The crews of the Airbus EC 725 AP helicopters from the No. 5 Squadron has completed their operations to transport essential food items to rural areas in Sarawak within the last five days. In total 13 sorties were conducted during the operations which were flown from the Miri airport to various parts of the interior of Sarawak.

A total of the 63, 723 lbs of essential food items were flown to 13 settlements namely Bario, Long Sait, Long Lellang, Long Sobeng, Long Aton, Long Loyang, Long Akah, Long Anap, Apau Nyaring, Long Palai, Long Apu, Patik dan Bai Lai. The food items were supplied by the Sarawak government for the residents in the settlements to ensure that they do not run out of food and ensuring they complied with the Movement Control Order enforced by the government to fight the Covid 19 pandemic.

Loading the food items at the Miri airport. TUDM

Two crews from No. 5 Squadron based in Labuan were involved in the flight operations. The first crew is led by Lt Kol Vachiral Ratanaphan a/l Ban Teang, co-pilot Kapt Mohd Firdaus Anual, and air quartermaster Flight Sgt Jacy Wharton Astillero. The second crew is led by Mej Frezal Raynol @ Zainal, co-pilot Kapt Syahir Jaafar and air quartermaster PW U II Sunerie Sugang

The cabin of an EC 725 AP after it is loaded with the food items. TUDM

𝗧𝗨𝗗𝗠 π—¦π—˜π—Ÿπ—˜π—¦π—”π—œ π— π—˜π—Ÿπ—”π—žπ—¦π—”π—‘π—”π—žπ—”π—‘ π—£π—˜π—‘π—šπ—›π—”π—‘π—§π—”π—₯𝗔𝗑 π—•π—˜π—žπ—”π—Ÿπ—”π—‘ π— π—”π—žπ—”π—‘π—”π—‘ 𝗔𝗦𝗔𝗦 π— π—˜π—Ÿπ—œπ—•π—”π—§π—žπ—”π—‘ 𝟭𝟯 π—žπ—”π—ͺ𝗔𝗦𝗔𝗑 π—£π—˜π——π—”π—Ÿπ—”π— π—”π—‘ 𝗦𝗔π—₯𝗔π—ͺπ—”π—ž π——π—”π—Ÿπ—”π—  π—§π—˜π— π—£π—’π—› 𝟱 𝗛𝗔π—₯π—œ

Walaupun terpaksa mengharungi cabaran cuaca yang tidak menentu serta kawasan yang bergunung, namun kecekapan dan kecekalan juruterbang serta anak kapal Helikopter EC 725AP TUDM telah berjaya melaksanakan penghantaran ke 13 kawasan pedalaman Negeri Sarawak yang memerlukan bantuan bekalan makanan asas dalam masa lima (5) hari.

Bagi misi terakhir hari ini, tiga (3) sortie penerbangan dilaksanakan oleh TUDM yang membawa bekalan makanan asas dari Lapangan Terbang Miri untuk dihantar tiga (3) kawasan pedalaman iaitu di Long Akah, Long Sobeng dan Long Aton.

Secara keseluruhannya, sebanyak 19 sortie penerbangan dengan muatan 63, 723 lbs telah dilaksanakan oleh TUDM dalam menjayakan misi penghantaran bekalan makanan asas ke 13 kawasan terlibat iaitu Bario, Long Sait, Long Lellang, Long Sobeng, Long Aton, Long Loyang, Long Akah, Long Anap, Apau Nyaring, Long Palai, Long Apu, Patik dan Bai Lai.

Program penghantaran bekalan makanan ini merupakan program kerjasama antara Angkatan Tentera Malaysia (ATM) dan Kerajaan Negeri Sarawak dalam memastikan agar masyarakat di kawasan pedalaman Sarawak terus terbela di samping mematuhi arahan PKP yang telah ditetapkan.

Tahniah dan syabas diucapkan kepada set kru anak kapal Helikopter EC 725 AP dari No 5 Skn, Pangkalan Udara Labuan yang terlibat menjayakan misi berterusan sepanjang 5 hari bermula 5 April lalu. Set kru pertama telah diketuai oleh Lt Kol Vachiral Ratanaphan a/l Ban Teang TUDM, dibantu oleh pembantu juruterbang, Kapt Mohd Firdaus bin Anual TUDM dan Kuartermaster Udara, Sjn U Jacy Wharton Astillero.

Manakala set kru kedua telah diketuai oleh Mej Frezal bin Raynol @ Zainal TUDM serta dibantu oleh pembantu juruterbang, Kapt Syahir bin Jaafar TUDM dan Kuartermaster Udara, PW U II Sunerie bin Sugang.

Khidmat TUDM diperlukan di dalam mendepani cabaran krisis kesihatan dunia akibat COVID-19 khususnya penghantaran melalui jalan udara akibat kesukaran untuk melalui jalan darat agar bantuan dapat disalurkan dengan segera. Semoga usaha ini dapat dimanfaatkan oleh rakyat dengan terus mematuhi PKP dan tidak keluar dari rumah agar wabak ini dapat diatasi dengan segera.

Getting the food items out from the helicopter. TUDM


— Malaysian Defence

If you like this post, buy me an espresso. Paypal Payment

Share
About Marhalim Abas 1631 Articles
Shah Alam

13 Comments

  1. Yes the Squadron only has a pair of Cougars on strength now that it’s Nuris are retired.

    Sustaining such a level as has been undertaken; with just a pair of platforms is sustainable but over a prolonged period it will be β€˜problematic’ to put it mildly …

    From a technical perspective a lot of the places flown to are challenging; involving flying over high terrain, mist, small/cramp landing spots and poor ATC in certain areas.

  2. Bomba’s Mi-17 is much better suited for this kinda tasks.

    Reply
    Yes but those places that RMAF went are those areas those with unpredictable weather. Also perhaps Bomba Mi-17s were not available

  3. Very2 off topic.

    In a few days time, indonesia could become the new covid 19 epicentre in asia. This could affect the situation in neighbouring countries too such as malaysia as we have a big indonesian community here.

    Currently our government has been managing the covid 19 spread in malaysia. We have also have preparation in place in case of any sudden increase like hundreds of quarentine areas and temporary hospitals like in serdang but for now thankfully our MCO has flattened the curve significantly.

    To help our neighbour indonesia, IMO our military medics can get together with say Brunei to set up a HADR covid 19 field hospital in indonesia, probably in kalimantan or sulawesi which has border or maritime crossings with sabah and sarawak. This could be set up in indoor stadiums for example.

    Any help for indonesia is better than nothing. Indonesia has just four doctors and 12 hospital beds per 10,000 people, and less than three intensive care beds per 100,000. These levels are way below World Health Organisation or Asia-Pacific standards. Unlike disasters like earthquake or tsunami, we have time to pre-emptively deploy before the covis 19 situation in indonesia goes bad.

  4. Sorry another off topic.

    Just read about this.

    http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/32869/this-man-owns-the-worlds-most-advanced-private-air-force-after-buying-46-f-a-18-hornets

    Really felt that we have missed one of our biggest opportunity…

    Air USA’s acquisition of all of the Royal Australian Air Force’s remaining F/A-18A/B Hornets. Canada had bought 25 prior to this deal going through. The jets Air USA is slated to receive, 46 in total, of which 36 are flying today, will be replaced by the F-35A Joint Strike Fighter within the RAAF’s ranks and thus will be totally retired from service by the end of 2021.

    Although the terms of the deal have not been disclosed, the purchase does include all of the RAAF’s F/A-18 spare parts inventory and test equipment, valued at over a billion dollars alone, according to Kirlin. Those parts will be incredibly valuable as Air USA is planning on putting every single airframe it receives back into serviceβ€”not just the 36 aircraft that are flyable today, but the other 10 that are not, as well.

    Those jets just need inspections and are not parted out or grounded for any other reasons. This will allow Air USA to operate at least three fully outfitted squadrons of the 4th generation fighters at all times, which Kirlin hopes will be forward deployed to key bases around the United States where they will primarily help give fleet pilots, testers, and tactics developers, a run for their money in the air-to-air combat arena.

    Overall, Kirlin informs us that that the Aussie Hornets are being imported in exactly the same configuration as they are flying operationally today the RAAF. Nothing is being removed, even the jet’s Link 16 data-link system and its internal M61 20mm Vulcan cannon are staying put.

    As for the condition of the surplus Hornet fleet, Kirlin says they are in incredible shape and show little signs of corrosionβ€”likely a result of their often hot and dry operating environment down under as opposed to the salty conditions aboard aircraft carriers that U.S. Navy Hornets have had to endure.

  5. Alex – β€˜ Mi-17 is much better suited for this kinda tasks’

    In what way are they better for such tasks?

    They are not fitted for all weather IFR flights; essential for such tasks. Do they even have an auto hover system? Such tasks might not call for the heli to hover for long or even at all but maintaining a hover manually for a period is not easy and strains the gear box.

  6. PKP3 / MCO3 is to be extended to 28 april

    more police/military/MMEA personnel to be deployed to secure malaysian borders to prevent illegal immigrants from entering the country.

  7. …. – β€œAny help for indonesia is better than nothing””

    Depends ….

    Will they be willing to accept the help and will that help actually lead to any tangible benefits for both countries or will it be more of a PR exercise?

    No doubt they need outside assistance in various areas but I have no idea if deployed MAF medical teams is actually something they need; notwithstanding any inadequacies in the Indonesian health system.

    For me a major worry is infected individuals managing to cross the extremely long and porous East Malaysian/Kalimantan border without being detected.

  8. I guess all available government service helicopter already deploy for this. Hope everyone stay healthy while giving their best services. After this disaster, NURI might end without replacement, no more new MPA (hope remaining 4 cn can convert become MPA), LCA might further delay… even our economy will be unforseen

  9. “No doubt they need outside assistance in various areas but I have no idea if deployed MAF medical teams is actually something they need”

    I have my doubts. To begin with, military surgeons and field hospitals are specialised in battlefield medicine and not infectious diseases. A deployable hospital has nowhere near the level of safety required for such a disease, so you will have to build or equip facilities from scratch rather than deploy what we have. You will need ventilators, which no country can spare unless and until the surge in production arrives.

    We have to reserve capacity for local needs (among civilians and troops exposed to such civilians on PKP duties). While deployed doctors can be recalled if the need arises, expending large amounts of single-use personal protective equipment while running a field hospital abroad is another matter.

  10. Azlan

    Why would a helicopter whose tasked to drop essential supply to hover above ground in the first place? Mi-17 is much more suitable than a cougar for the same reason as a pickup truck is a much more suitable to haul cargo than a sedan. They are meant to bring supply from point A to point B

    I know that hindsight is always 20/20 but the decision to retire nuri right before coronavirus strike is a poor one. Is there any chance of activating at least several of them for minimum duty?

    Reply
    AFAIK, no

  11. Dundiun – β€œWhy would a helicopter whose tasked to drop essential supply to hover above ground in the first place”

    This is what I clearly mentioned in my previous post – β€œSuch tasks might not call for the heli to hover for long or even at all but maintaining a hover manually for a period is not easy and strains the gear box”

    My mention of the lack of an auto hover was the highlight a inadequacy with BOMBA’s M-17s. I did not suggest that the capability was needed to distribute food supplies to various interior areas in Sarawak.

    Dundun – β€œMi-17 is much more suitable than a cougar for the same reason as a pickup truck is a much more suitable to haul cargo than a sedan. They are meant to bring supply from point A to point B”

    Only if weather conditions are fine. If flights are required at night or in bad weather conditions the Cougar is much more suitable as it’s rated for IFR. Note that much of the flying in the area takes place over mountainous terrain and weather can change with little notice. We only have to look at the challenges faced by the Nuris which were rated for VFR and yet were required to fly in such challenging or non benign conditions with politicians dragging their feet for the upgrade which was requested as far back as the 1990’s.

    As such, how can anyone – especially after taking all factors into account – suggest that BOMBA’s Mil-17s (being rated for VFR) are suitable for the role of distributing supplies in the interior of Sarawak compared to the RMAF’s Cougars?

  12. Dundun – β€œI know that hindsight is alwaysβ€œ

    Doesn’t take hindsight to realise that retiring anything before a replacement is available is a gamble. A gamble that will turn out well or otherwise; depending on the circumstances.

    Take the LCA programme. We’ve decided to focus on the LCA because it requires much less financial outlay compared to MRCAs and we figure that the threat environment is such that we can go without MRCAs for the foreseeable future. All fine if things go as plan but if we’re suddenly faced with a situation that a LCA can’t handle and which the 8 Hornets and 18 MKMs are too few; then we’re screwed.

    Back to the Nuris. It’s yet another case of something going rat shit because of the reluctance of politicians to provide the needed funding. Had an upgrade proceeded as planned many many years ago; the Nuris would still be flying and (despite whatever issues associated with age or other factors) would be capable of performing the required roles.

  13. This morning if my eye not wrong, i saw a NURI fly pass my house. Maybe can get some info from mindef regarding this.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*