Nav Radars for LCS

SHAH ALAM: The nav radars for the first LCS has been delivered to the Boustead Naval Dockyard in Lumut, recently. The radars are the Kelvin Hughes Sharpeye in the E/F-band (X &; S-Band), industry sources told Malaysian Defence.

The nav radars will be be installed on the DCNS-designed panoramic sensors and intelligence module (PSIM). The PSIM combines an integrated mast, complete with the main radar (Thales Smart-S Mark 2 3D radar) under the radome and all the other sensors, plus the ops rooms and the associated equipment compartments into a single module.

The location of the PSIM module as shown on the Egyptian Gowind. It will be the same location for the RMN's LCS. DCNS
The location of the PSIM module as shown on the Egyptian Gowind. It will be the same location for the RMN’s LCS. DCNS

It is likely that LCS’s PSIM module is already undergoing assembly and once completed, it will be used to conduct system and integration tests at the BNS facility. During the construction of the Kedah-class, the ship’s CMS also underwent assembly and testing on land in Lumut before they were installed on the intended vessels.

A CGI of the PSIM module undergoing testing on land prior to be being mated to the ship. DCNS.
A CGI of the PSIM module undergoing testing on land prior to be being mated to the ship. . DCNS.

Once the ship is launched, the PSIM module will be hoisted into its location amidships just behind the bridge.

A DCNS graphic explaining the PSIM module. DCNS.
A DCNS graphic explaining the PSIM module. DCNS.

For the first LCS, the mating of the PSIM module is likely to be conducted by the second half of 2017 as the ship is only expected to be launched by April.

Egypt first Gowind 2500 after her launching on Sept. 17, 2016.  Note that the PISM has not been installed. DCNS
Egypt first Gowind 2500 after her launching on Sept. 17, 2016. Note that the PSIM has not been installed. DCNS

With two Sharpeyes per ship, Kelvin Hughes will supply 12 radars for the LCS programme. And a dozen more will also be needed for second batch of the LCS as envisioned by the RMN’s 15 to 5 plan.

PCU Gagah Samudera, prior to her launch. in late 2012.
PCU Gagah Samudera, prior to her launch. in late 2012.

Apart from the LCS, the Sharpeyes were also selected for the two RMN training ships, Gagah Samudera and Teguh Samudera. Both ships have had these radars installed on them as they are prepared for commissioning. These nav radars were stored for some three years as the ships were left uncompleted after the shipyard went belly-up. The ships are fitted with a single Sharpeye radar each.

A CGI of the NGPC
A CGI of the NGPC

Industry sources also told Malaysian Defence that the same Sharpeye radars have been selected for the six New Generation Patrol Craft (NGPC) being built by Destini Bhd for the Malaysian Maritime Enforcement Agency (MMEA). The first NGPC is expected to be launch by year end.

Kelvin Hughes on its product .

Launched in 2008, more than 25 navies now use SharpEye™ radars and displays, which deliver improvements in sub-clutter visibility by approximately 30dB, enabling targets with a low RCS (Radar Cross Section), typically 0.5m2, to be detected even in heavy rain and high sea states. Doppler processing enables clutter removal without picture degradation. This combined with a host of other unique and special features in the radar sensor and display provides an unprecedented level of situational awareness to naval and coastguard vessels from a navigation radar.

Sharpeye navigation radars on a mast of an OPV.
Sharpeye navigation radars on a mast of an OPV.

So if the nav radars for the first LCS had been delivered to BNS, what about the rest of the equipment? Apart from the nav radars, I have not been told of anything else but I am pretty sure that some other equipment would have been delivered to Lumut.

A Sharpeye nav radar on a patrol ship.
A Sharpeye nav radar on a patrol ship.

There are other items which I have been told would be shipped to Lumut, once BNS could confirmed the launch date of the first LCS. As the launch of the ship is tentative at the moment, some companies is on “holding mode”.

Some of the equipment are already manufactured and waiting to be shipped only while others are still being manufactured – the Just in Time – philosophy.

It will be shipped to Malaysia near to the date of the launch or shortly after it so the equipment could be install without spending much time in the warehouse.

The latest generation MSI DS30 30mm gun complete with EO sight and remote operator console. Two similar system will be installed on each LCS.
The latest generation MSI DS30 30mm gun complete with EO sight and remote operator console. Two similar system will be installed on each LCS.

As in any programme, the companies involved would also have to abide by the contract as when to deliver their equipment. Late deliveries could result in huge penalties.

The selection of the Sharpeyes is quite interesting, at least to me. I had been told that Kelvin Hughes will no longer be in the mix following the recent RMN tender exercise where its radars was not selected. But as usual, the more, the merrier!

The Terma 6000 nav radar installed on the US Navy test ship. Stilleto. Picture credit US Navy.
The Terma 6000 nav radar installed on the US Navy test ship. Stilleto. Picture credit US Navy.

Malaysian Defence had previously written that RMN had selected the Terma Scanter 6000 nav radars to be installed on the KD Jebat and KD Lekiu as well as KD Mahawangsa and KD Sri Inderasakti.

The status of the installation is not known at the moment, however.

— Malaysian Defence

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